DOJ Fights Mergers

by Dr. Merrill Matthews

Many health policy experts warned that the Affordable Care Act would lead to massive consolidation in the health care industry, including hospitals, physicians’ practices, and especially health insurers. Now the Justice Department is pushing back by opposing the mergers of four large health insurers—Aetna with Humana and Anthem with Cigna. The real question is whether the insurers will continue to sell in the exchanges if they aren’t allowed to merge?

The Obama administration says that the mergers would reduce competition. Attorney General Loretta Lynch explained, “If allowed to proceed, these mergers would fundamentally reshape the health insurance industry.” That’s rich, since nothing has reshaped the health insurance industry more than Obamacare—and by design.

But government antitrust litigation is almost always about politics rather than economics. And that’s why free market advocates tend to be skeptical of most government antitrust efforts; companies, not the government, are in the best position to judge whether a merger would be beneficial.

And politics is certainly at work in this instance. President Obama promised the country that his health care legislation would increase competition and lower health insurance premiums. Now that just the opposite is happening, his administration is trying to limit the fallout and appear to be fighting for the consumer. But blocking the mergers will likely hurt consumers and competition.

Health insures are fleeing the Obamacare exchanges because of financial losses. A recent McKinsey & Co. survey found that health insurers selling in the individual market—where individuals buy their own coverage, usually through Obamacare exchanges—lost $2.7 billion in 2014. Those loses only compounded in 2015. The Hill reports that Humana “is pulling out of Obamacare plans in all but a handful of states after a year of nearly $1 billion in losses.”

Aetna said it lost about $140 million on the individual market in 2015. The Texas Blues Cross parent company, which controls Blues plans in five states, lost a reported $2 billion—$720 million just in Texas.

Oscar, a start-up health insurer that was supposed to bring new thinking to the individual health insurance market lost $105 million on Obamacare exchanges in 2015—and that was in just two states, New York and New Jersey.

UnitedHealthcare, the largest health insurer, reported last January that it lost $720 million in 2015 selling individual health insurance on the Obamacare exchanges. And about $1 billion when 2014 and 2015 were combined. And 16 of the 23 nonprofit Obamacare co-ops—which were the left’s consolation price for not getting their “public option”—have gone under, with more collapses on the way.

The left has long wanted to “take the profits out of health care,” and Obamacare seems to be doing exactly that. Obama officials dismiss the health insurer losses, claiming that many of the insurers are still profitable. But that’s because health insurers often have several lines of business, some of which may be profitable even as they lose hundreds of millions of dollars selling in Obamacare exchanges. No responsible board of directors will let such losses continue indefinitely. Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation has been quoted as saying, “Something has to give. Either insurers will drop out or insurers will raise premiums.” And that’s exactly what we’re seeing. Nationwide, there was a 12% decline in plans in 2016 as compared to 2015, and that includes a 40% decline in PPO plans. There will be even more exits in 2017. Prior to Obamacare there were 18 insurers offering individual coverage in Kansas. Today there are three. The Obama administration initially praised health insurance competition in Maricopa County, Arizona. This year there were eight plans available on the Obamacare exchange; next year there will only be four—unless Aetna drops out, too. And insurers that choose to remain are increasing premiums. Texas Blue Cross has requested an increase of up to 60% for its 2017 premiums, and Arizona Blue Cross requested a 65% increase.

We know Humana, without the merger, is pulling out. Aetna claimed for months it would remain in the Obamacare exchanges, but is now saying it may scale back. And Anthem announced recently that it will only expand into other exchanges if it’s Cigna merger goes through. In other words, the Obama administration’s efforts to keep four insurers from becoming two may mean that only one or none will continue selling on the Obamacare exchanges.

Expect to see even fewer insurers participating and higher premiums as financial losses increase, especially if the Obama administration continues its efforts to stop money-losing insurers from merging. Policyholders will likely be receiving the notice that their premiums are rising or policy is being canceled in September or October—just before the election.

Merrill Mathews is a resident scholar with he Institute for Policy Innovation at ipi.org.

Response to DOJ’s Move To Block Mergers

The Justice Dept. is suing to block two proposed mergers between major health insurance companies, saying the deals violate antitrust laws. The lawsuits argue that a $37 billion merger between Humana and Aetna would lead to higher health-insurance prices, reduced benefits, less innovation, and worse service for over a million Americans. The DOJ also says that the $54 billion acquisition of Cigna by Anthem would be the largest merger in the history of the health insurance industry. California insurance commissioner Dave Jones said, “I urged the DOJ to prevent these health insurance mergers, which would result in a highly concentrated, less competitive health insurance market doing irreparable harm to consumers and businesses. During the public hearings I convened, I questioned executives from Anthem, Cigna, Aetna and Humana. None of the companies were able to substantiate their claims of savings associated with the mergers. Not one company executive was willing to commit to pass along alleged cost savings to consumers through lower premiums. Bigger is not better when it comes to health insurance mergers. History has shown that health insurance mergers result in higher prices, fewer choices, and lower quality of care.”

Dr. Merrill Matthews of The Institute for Policy Innovation said, “The Obama administration is attempting to block the Aetna-Humana and Anthem-Cigna mergers because it wants more competition, but if compounding financial losses force these companies to drop out of the exchanges, there won’t be any competition. Two larger health insurers are better than none. Health insurance company mergers started shortly after the ACA passed in order to survive the new environment of high costs and government regulations…For example, Arizona’s Maricopa County was once praised as a center of robust competition with eight insurance companies competing in its ACA exchange. But in just a few years, that number will drop to only three insurers, two of which are Aetna and Cigna. If Washington stifles these same companies’ attempts to stay afloat in the exchanges, Maricopa County and other areas could see only a single insurer available in its marketplace—if any at all…If the Department of Justice’s stonewalling is successful, those insurers will likely join many others and pull out of the Obamacare exchanges, leaving even less competition and higher prices. And that will force the administration to devise even more excuses for why health care costs are exploding.”

Commissioner Urges DOJ to Block Anthem/Cigna Merger

CIGNA-AnthemMerger

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones is urging the Dept. of Justice to block the merger of Anthem and Cigna. The merger, which is estimated to be worth more than $50 billion, would make Anthem the nation’s largest health insurer. Anthem’s market share would exceed 50% in 28 California counties and 40% in 38 counties. Jones said that the merger would reduce access to quality care, and reduce health insurance affordability. Under California law, the commissioner does not have direct approval authority over the Anthem and Cigna merger since Cigna is domiciled in Connecticut.

At a public hearing on March 29, Anthem executives claimed that the merger would result in $2 billion in savings. But Jones said that Anthem provided only vague and speculative assertions when asked to back up that claim. At the hearing, Anthem would not commit to pass any savings onto consumers through lower prices.

Jones said, “More competition in California’s consolidated health insurance markets is needed, not less. Competition helps restrain prices, provides choice, and improves quality. The Anthem and Cigna merger reduces competition in a market that is already dominated by just four health insurers. It will likely result in reducing consumers’ choices, increased prices, and lower quality care,” he said. Jones provided the following statistics about California in 2014:

  • The four largest insurers controlled 85% of the market.
  • Four insurers controlled 82% of the large group market statewide.
  • Four insurers controlled 88% of the small group market.
  • Four insurers controlled 93% of the individual market.
  • In Covered California, the four largest plans controlled 95% of the individual market in 2014 and 91% of the market in 2015.

Insurer Obamacare Losses Reach Billions Of Dollars After Two Years

Bruce Japsen ,

CONTRIBUTOR

I write about health care and policies from the president’s hometown

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

After two years offering uninsured Americans subsidized products on public exchanges, health insurance companies have been hard-pressed to find financial success in this segment of the Affordable Care Act with losses reaching billions of dollars for the industry.

UnitedHealth Group UNH +0.77% lost more than $720 million on its public exchange business last year, and United is a small player in this market compared to Anthem ANTM +0.84%, which operates Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans in 14 states, and said money-losing Obamacare plans caused profits to fall 64% in the fourth quarterAetna AET +0.16%, which hopes to finalize its acquisition of Humana HUM -0.29% later this year, said last week individual coverage sold under the health law “remained unprofitable” last year.

The financial performance has come into view in the last two weeks following release of 2015 annual and fourth-quarter earnings.

A demonstrator in support of  the Affordable Care Act holds an “ACA is here to stay” sign outside the Supreme Court after justices ruled 6-3 to save Obamacare tax subsidies on June 25, 2015. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Other Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, some nonprofits and others owned by policyholders, are also reporting hundreds of millions in losses on health plans they sell on public exchanges. For example, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina has reported losses of more than $400 million through last year and Health Care Service Corp., which owns five Blue Cross plans including those in Illinois and Texas, lost more than $240 million in 2014 and remained unprofitable in its public exchange business last year. Health Care Service has yet to disclose 2015 financials for its nearly 2 million members in its individual business that includes Obamacare enrollment, a company spokesman said.

For insurers, the problem has largely been a major increase in medical expenses from these new patients, who were previously uninsured. From an actuarial standpoint, the health plans say they didn’t know what they would be getting and therefore needed more healthy people to buy premiums to cover the costs of the sick. So far, medical expenses are getting the upper hand. For example,Anthem’s fourth-quarter “benefit expense ratio” was 87% compared to 84.5% in the year-ago period.

But insurers, for the most part, see 2016 as a potential breakout year as they get a handle on pricing and narrow provider networks to better control costs.

Anthem CEO Joe Swedish, who has complained rivals have underpriced their products to get enrollment in the first two years, looks for the public exchange business to rebound following two years of pricing he’s described as “unsustainable.” Analysts say Anthem might even have stronger offerings following its acquisition of Cigna CI -0.04%, should that close later this year.

Medicare Advantage 2016 Spotlight

medicareadvantage


The number of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare Advantage has climbed steadily over the past decade; this trend in enrollment growth continues in 2016. The enrollment growth has occurred despite provisions under the ACA that reduce payments to plans. As of 2016, the payment reductions have been phased in fully in 78% of counties, accounting for 70% of beneficiaries and 68% of Medicare Advantage enrollees, according to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The following are study highlights:

  • Medicare Advantage enrollment has increased in virtually all states over the past year. Almost one in three people on Medicare (31% or 17.6 million beneficiaries) is enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan in 2016. The penetration rate exceeds 40% in five states.
  • 18% of enrollees are in a group plan. Employers and their retirees still favor local PPOs over HMOs.
  • Enrollment is still highly concentrated. If Aetna acquired Humana with no divestitures in 2016, the combined firm would account for 25% of Medicare Advantage enrollees nationwide. UnitedHealthcare and Humana account for 39% of enrollment in 2016.
  • Premiums were relatively constant from 2015 to 2016 ($37 a month in 2016 versus $38 a month in 2015), although premiums vary widely across states, counties, and plan types.
  • In 2016, the average enrollee had an out-of-pocket limit of $5,223, which is nearly $1,000 higher than in 2011.
  • 31% of the Medicare population is enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan. Total Medicare Advantage enrollment grew 5%, from 2015 to 2016. This reflects the influence of seniors aging on to Medicare and beneficiaries shifting from traditional Medicare to Medicare Advantage.
  • 64% of Medicare Advantage enrollees are in HMOs; 23% are in local PPOs; 7% are in regional PPOs; 1% are in private fee-for-service plans; and 4% are in other types of plans including cost plans and Medicare medical savings accounts.
  • Enrollment in private fee-for-service plans has declined slowly since the Medicare Improvements for Patients & Providers Act (MIPPA) of 2008. Under the law, in most parts of the country, private fee-for-service plans must have a provider network. About 1% of Medicare Advantage enrollees are in these plans. 26% of enrollees in private fee-for-service plans are in counties in which private fee-for-service plans are exempt from network requirements.
  • Medicare Advantage enrollment in California grew 6% from 2015 to 2016.
  • 44% of beneficiaries in Los Angeles County, California are enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans compared to only 11% of beneficiaries in Santa Cruz County, California.
  • The average MA prescription drug enrollee pays a monthly premium of about $37, which is 1% less than in 2015. Actual premiums are $28 a month for HMOs, $63 a month for local PPOs, and $76 a month for private fee-for-service plans. Average Medicare Advantage premiums for HMOs and local PPOs have decreased since the ACA was enacted while average premiums have increased for regional PPOs and private fee-for-service plans.
  • In 2016, 81% of Medicare beneficiaries had a choice of at least one zero premium MA prescription drug plan. From 2015 to 2016, the share of enrollees in zero premium MA prescription drug benefits remained relatively unchanged (48% in 2015 versus 49% in 2016). Fifty-nine percent of HMO enrollees are in zero premium plans; 38% are in regional PPOs; and 22% are in local PPOs. No zero premium private fee-for-service plans plans were offered in 2015 or 2016.
  • The average out-of-pocket limit for a MA prescription drug enrollee is $5,223, up from $5,041 in 2015 and $4,313 in 2011. The share of enrollees in plans with limits above $5,000 has greatly increased across all plan types. Fifty-two percent of enrollees are in plans with limits above $5,000 in 2016 compared to 46% in 2015. Thirty-seven percent of enrollees in 2016 are in plans with limits at the $6,700 maximum, compared to 32% in 2015 and 17% in 2011. Ninety-nine percent of regional PPO enrollees and 62% of local PPO enrollees are in plans with limits above $5,000 in 2016. In comparison, 45% of HMO enrollees are in plans with limits above $5,000 in 2016.
  • The standard Medicare Part D plan has a $360 drug deductible and 25% coinsurance up to an initial coverage limit of $3,310. That is followed by a coverage gap (the doughnut hole) in which beneficiaries pay a larger share until their total out-of-pocket Part D spending reaches $4,850. After exceeding this catastrophic threshold, beneficiaries pay 5% of the cost of drugs.
  • 95% of Kaiser Permanente’s enrollees are in HMOs. In contrast, enrollment in UnitedHealthcare and Humana plans is mostly in HMOs, but includes significant shares in local and regional PPOs. Humana’s distribution continues the shift from earlier years when a much larger share of Humana’s enrollees was in private fee-for-service plans plans. Enrollment in BCBS plans is split between HMOs (46%) and local PPOs (41%), with the remainder in regional PPOs and other plan types including private fee-for-service plans plans.
  • Kaiser Permanente’s presence is more geographically focused than other major national employers, with a heavy concentration in California, Colorado, the District of Columbia and Maryland.
  • Medicare Advantage enrollment could become more concentrated if Aetna’s acquisition of Humana and Anthem’s acquisition of Cigna are approved, particularly if few divestitures are required. If no divestitures are required in Aetna’s acquisition of Humana, the combined company would account for 25% of Medicare Advantage enrollment nationwide. UnitedHealthcare accounts for 21% of enrollment this year.
  • The Anthem’s acquisition of Cigna would have a less visible affect on the national Medicare Advantage market. Nationwide, Anthem accounts for 3% of Medicare Advantage enrollment and Cigna accounts for another 3%.
  • For many years, CMS has posted quality ratings for Medicare Advantage plans. In 2016, 68% of plans had four or more stars. In focus groups, seniors have said that they don’t use the star ratings to select a plan. Nonetheless, the star ratings may be correlated with factors that seniors do use to select their plan, including provider networks, and plan benefits and costs, and thus may be correlated with enrollment.
  • The Congressional Budget Office projects that about 41% of Medicare beneficiaries will be enrolled in Medicare Advantage in 2026. This growth may prompt some to question what it will mean if the preponderance of beneficiaries are in Medicare Advantage plans.

Groups Says California Should Reject the Anthem-Cigna Merger

Consumer Watchdog called on Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones to reject a proposed merger of Anthem and Cigna. Carmen Balber with Consumer Watchdog said, “Insurance industry consolidation has gone too far in California, costing consumers in the form of higher prices, reduced benefits, narrower networks, and fewer choices. It is no longer believable to claim that making the few insurance giants larger could benefit consumers. It’s time to draw a line in the sand. The only action that truly protects California policyholders is for the Dept. of Insurance to reject the Anthem-Cigna deal.” Nine metro areas in California will be among the hardest-hit in the nation if the merger is approved, and nearly every major population center in the state could be affected, according to an American Medical Association analysis using federal merger guidelines,” she said.

The following is a summary of a statement prepared by Consumer Watchdog: If the Anthem-Cigna merger proceeds, Anthem will gain a near-monopoly in the self-insured market at 69% of the market, meaning higher costs and less options for large companies that pay Anthem or Cigna to administer their health plans and employ nearly 4 million Californians. A merged Anthem-Cigna would surpass Kaiser to become the largest insurer in the state. Regulators cannot exact enough concessions from the companies to protect consumers from the negative impacts of an Anthem-Cigna merger.

Consumer Watchdog recommends these conditions for approving the merger:

  • Anthem should commit to not implementing rate hikes that regulators find to be unreasonable.
  • Anthem should be prohibited from upstreaming profits to its parent company while increasing premiums.
  • Anthem should have to disclose details of any administrative services payments to its parent company out of state. This would allow the public to determine whether the payments have been inflated to hide upstreaming of California policyholder money to shareholders.
  • Anthem should not be allowed to remove reserves from California or otherwise require California policyholders to pay for severance, retention, or other compensation packages for executives in connection with the merger.
  • Anthem should immediately submit its provider networks for review.
  • Anthem should commit to expanding network size for all plans that give consumers access to less than 50% of providers in the area.
  • Anthem’s filings with the Dept. of Insurance should be public documents. Grants of confidentiality should only be allowed sparingly, with explanation of the sensitive nature of the withheld documents, if at all.
  • Anthem should be subject to steep penalties for violating any provision of these undertakings, and revocation of approval if there is a pattern of violations.

Many Pregnant Women Are Missing Dental Checkups

A survey by Cigna finds that 43% of pregnant women don’t go for a dental checkup though 76% say they suffer from oral health problems during pregnancy, such as bleeding gums or toothaches. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can worsen certain oral health conditions, such as gum disease. Only 55% of women rate their oral health as very good or excellent during pregnancy, a drop from 63% pre-pregnancy. Thirty-six percent of expectant mothers say that it has been more than a year since their last preventive dental visit. Cost is the primary reason why pregnant women skip dental checkups, even among those with dental benefits. Some dental benefit plans even have special maternity programs with additional services like extra cleanings or discounts on oral health prescriptions. Those who took advantage of a dental maternity program through their dental benefit plan had better oral health habits than those who did not participate or did not have a program available to them.

Sixty-two percent of women brush their teeth at least twice a day. That percentage climbs to 76% for
those who are participating or who have participated in a dental benefit maternity program. Forty-eight percent of women floss at least once a day. That percentage surges to 81% for women who are participating or who have participated in a dental benefit maternity program. Seventy-four percent of women who are participating or have participated in a dental benefit plan maternity program rate their oral health as very good or excellent compared to 55% of pregnant women overall.

While 97% of women saw their medical doctor/obstetrician as frequently as directed during their pregnancy, only 44% said that oral health was mentioned in those visits. Women whose doctors talked about their oral health during pregnancy are about twice as likely to do the following:

  • Have a dental checkup while pregnant (77% vs. 41%)
  • Read materials about the importance of oral health (87% vs. 42%)

The effects of the doctor’s influence seems to last beyond delivery while only 43% of new mothers have had a dental checkup since giving birth, that percentage climbs to 63% for women whose doctors discussed oral health during maternity visits. Postpartum dental visits are also important, particularly as dental hygiene may slip once the baby arrives. More than one-third of new mothers say they are brushing and flossing less frequently than before the baby – many blaming lack of time.

Half of new mothers clean their infant’s gums daily, but nearly two-thirds do so if the pediatrician has discussed their baby’s oral health. However, 34% of new mothers say the pediatrician has not discussed care of their child’s teeth and gums with them.

How Incentives Can Make Health Care More Affordable

A three-year Cigna study shows how a handful of correctable health conditions contribute to the health care costs of American workers. Study provides evidence that those with unhealthy biometrics and those who have not completed biometric screening measures are more likely to incur high costs. Findings provide evidence that incentive programs can lead to better health engagement and behavior, clinical outcomes and costs.

The bad news is that higher weight, cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar can raise health costs and out-of-pocket health expenses. The worse news is that what you don’t know about your health could be even more costly to you.

The good news is there are health improvement programs and incentive strategies that are proven to help people address the conditions that increase costs, according to a three-year study of health plan consumer data by Cigna.

The Cigna study of 200,000 customers shows how a handful of correctable health conditions can contribute to their average annual health care costs. A body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 increases total health care costs by an average of more than $2,460 per customer per year, and adds $492 in annual out-of-pocket costs.

A cholesterol reading of more than 240 translates into an average total health care cost increase of $1,644 per health plan customer, per year, and adds more than $353 in annual out-of-pocket costs.
Two or more chronic conditions indicated by unhealthy BMI, blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar raises annual out-of-pocket expense by almost $1,300 per year, and total healthcare costs by nearly $9,000 per year.

When it comes to health conditions, those who have not undergone a biometric screening have higher health costs. For example, those who have not had blood pressure screening have total health costs that are $2,064 higher per year, and $400 more in out-of-pocket costs, than those who have verified that their blood pressure is lower than 140/90.

Those who have not had a blood glucose screening have total health costs that are $1,332 higher per year, and $266 more in out-of-pocket costs, than those who have verified that their blood glucose is lower than 100.
Incentives more than doubled biometric screening rates from 20% to 55% in 2014.

Incentives increase the probability of engaging in a coaching program by 24% and by 30% for those with chronic conditions. Incentives increase the probability of setting and meeting goals by 18% and meeting with a health coach by 43%. Incentives also increased the probability of meeting biometric targets.

Cigna’s chief nursing officer, Mary Picerno said, “Employers are increasingly rewarding employees who identify and address their potential health risks by discounting the employee’s health plan premiums or adding funds to their health spending account to lower their annual out-of-pocket expenses.”

Reactions to Anthem/Cigna Merger

Anthem and Cigna have entered into a definitive agreement whereby Anthem will acquire all outstanding shares of Cigna in a cash and stock transaction. The Anthem board of directors will be expanded to 14 members. David Cordani and four independent directors from Cigna’s current board of directors will join the nine

Joseph Swedish, president and CEO of Anthem said, “The Cigna team has built a set of capabilities that greatly complement our own offerings and the combined company will have a competitive presence across commercial, government, international and specialty segments. “The complementary nature of our businesses will allow us to leverage the deep global health care knowledge, local market talent, and expertise of both organizations to ensure that consumers have access to affordable and personalized solutions across diverse life and health stages and position us for sustained success,” said David M. Cordani, president and CEO of Cigna. The transaction is expected to close in the second half of 2016, pending state regulatory approvals.  Anthem is confident in its ability to obtain all necessary regulatory and other approvals.

Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones said, “California’s health insurance market already suffers from consolidation with the four largest health insurers in the individual market controlling more than 85% of the market. Further consolidation will result in even less competition among health insurers and will leave consumers and employers with fewer choices and the potential for greater premium increases. Studies of prior mergers of health insurers found that health insurance prices increased as a result of mergers. “Health insurers are enjoying record share values and profits, which are paid for by consumers and employers. There is no requirement that any savings from these mergers be passed along to consumers or employers. In California, there is no authority to reject excessive health insurance rate increases, unlike 35 other states. We will review the mergers based on what is best for California consumers and employers. We will also work closely with other state and federal regulators,” he added.

Steven Stack, MD, president of the American Medical Association said, “The lack of a competitive health insurance market allows the few remaining companies to exploit their market power, dictate premium increases, and pursue corporate policies that are contrary to patient interests. Health insurers have been unable to demonstrate that mergers create efficiency and lower health insurance premiums…The U.S. Department of Justice has recognized that patient interests can be harmed when a big insurer has a stranglehold on a local market. Federal and state regulators must take a hard look at proposed health insurer mergers. Antitrust laws that prohibit harmful mergers must be enforced and anti-competitive conduct by insurers must be stopped.” “Based on federal guidelines, the proposed Anthem-Cigna merger would be presumed to be anticompetitive in the commercial, combined (HMO+PPO+POS) markets in nine of the 14 states (NH, ME, IN, CT, VA, CO, GA, NV, KY) in which Anthem is licensed to provide coverage,” he added.

An AMA study of the 2008 merger involving UnitedHealth Group and Sierra Health Services found that premiums increased after the merger by almost 14% compared to a control group. The study reveals a serious decline in competition among health insurers with nearly three out of four metropolitan areas rated as highly concentrated. In fact, 41% of metropolitan areas had a single health insurer with a commercial market share of 50% or more.

UnitedHealth and Anthem Look to Purchase Smaller Carriers

 

UnitedHealth and Anthem Look to Purchase Smaller Carriers


TheStreet.com reports that UnitedHealth, Anthem, Aetna, Humana, and Cigna are involved in a buzz of merger and acquisition activity, as the health insurance industry is responding to the aftershocks of the Affordable Care Act.

Fitch Ratings reports that a combination of any of the five largest U.S. health insurers could accelerate further merger and acquisition activity in the managed care sector. Just one mega M&A deal could lead to similar responses by competing firms seeking to shore up competitive disadvantages in scale and product lines. Fitch sees the M&A potential in the health insurance sector as a direct response to anticipated market conditions in a post-Affordable Care Act (ACA) world. Rumors of health insurance M&A activity among the five largest publicly traded health insurers in the U.S. have accelerated in recent weeks.

Fitch says that the ACA, would add to health insurers’ membership volumes, but reduce member margins. This margin pressure would be exacerbated by the government’s challenging fiscal condition, employers’ on-going desire to reduce health care costs, and a heightened need to invest heavily in technology.

As a result, Fitch believes that size and scale are quite important to health insurers’ competitive positions and financial results. In addition, the importance of product line (i.e. individual, group, Medicare, Medicaid) diversification will increase in response to the government’s increasing role in the market, the aging U.S. population and employers’ desires to reduce health care costs

Last Updated 11/18/2020

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