White House Warns Of COVID Surges In The Winter

White House warns of Covid surges in the winter - POLITICO

Source: Politico, by Hannah Farrow

Covid cases surged during the last two winters and are likely to again this year — unless the country can prepare and act, White House Covid-19 response coordinator Ashish Jha said Sunday morning.

“If we don’t get ahead of this thing, we’ll have a lot of waning immunity, this virus continues to evolve and we may see a pretty sizable wave of infections, hospitalizations and deaths this fall and winter,” Jha said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Congress needs to provide resources, Jha said, specifically $22.5 billion, a number that will help with a vaccine supply that’s dwindling. In March, White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Jeff Zients said: “If the science shows that fourth doses are needed for the general population later this year, we will not have the supply necessary to ensure shots are available.”

The money, once allocated, would go toward Covid vaccine supply and coronavirus testing.

“If Congress doesn’t step up and fund these, I think, urgent and emergent priorities … they can’t wait until the fall, it will be too late,” Jha said.

And the proof is in the jab. With cases increasing in the Northeast, deaths remain low because of high vaccination rates.

“That’s not true for the whole country,” Jha said.

With enough resources to get more people vaccinated and more therapeutics in place, he said, “I do think we can get through this winter without a lot of suffering and death.”

Trump v. Clinton: How They Line Up On Health

The Philadelphia Inquirer offers an analysis on the Candidate’s Position on health care. The following is a summary the article:

Health insurance

  • Clinton: Wants to improve the Affordable Care Act. She wants to reduce the cost of health insurance purchased on exchanges and provide a tax credit of up to $5,000 a family to offset out-of-pocket costs and premiums above 5% of household income. She would expand tax credits and cap the cost of premiums at 8.5% of family income. She calls for fixing the “family glitch” so families can access coverage in the exchanges when their employer’s family plan is not affordable. She would allow undocumented immigrants to buy insurance through the exchanges. In what is seen as a nod to Bernie Sanders’ supporters, she is affirming support for a public option that would allow people as young as 55 to buy health insurance through Medicare.
  • Trump: Opposes requiring people to buy health insurance. He wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act. He proposes to make coverage more affordable by allowing sales of health insurance across state lines and permitting people to deduct health insurance premium payments from their taxes. He would emphasize tax-deductible health savings accounts (HSA) where funds could accumulate if they are not used. He wants to require price transparency by health-care providers so that people can shop around for the best prices. He also wants would-be immigrants to certify that they can pay for their own health care.

Prescription drugs

  • Clinton: Wants to eliminate tax breaks that pharmaceutical companies get for direct-to-consumer advertising, and require those that benefit from federal research spending to reinvest profits into research. She would ban legal settlements in which pharma companies pay competitors so they will hold off on introducing generics and would allow consumers to import cheaper drugs from countries such as Canada. She supports allowing Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices and would cap out-of-pocket costs for people with chronic health problems.
  • Trump: Calls for a free market for prescription drugs, including allowing consumers to import them from countries that regulate prices. This practice is now illegal, though the law is not firmly enforced.

Medicaid

  • Clinton: Supports president Obama’s proposal to let states that sign up for Medicaid expansion to get a 100% match for the first three years. She would expand access to Medicaid and children’s health insurance.
  • Trump: Wants states to get federal Medicaid funding through block grants, which could mean fewer dollars for many states, but would give local officials more authority over expenditures.

Medicare

  • Clinton: Has vowed to fight proposals to privatize or phase out Medicare, and would give Medicare the power to negotiate lower drug costs.
  • Trump: Is against abolishing Medicare.

Social Security

  • Clinton: Opposes privatizing Social Security, reducing annual cost-of-living adjustments, and raising the retirement age. Clinton would expand Social Security for some, such as widows and caregivers, and help to fund the benefit through a wealth tax.
  • Trump: Has voiced support for Social Security and called it “honoring a deal.” He has said that Republicans cannot win elections if they seek to change it substantially.

Veterans Administration

  • Clinton: Says she would ensure more timely benefits, block privatization efforts, and strengthen services for military families and employment programs for veterans.
  • Trump: Has vowed to reform the agency and make it more efficient in delivering service and employment assistance.

Abortion

  • Clinton: Wants to protect access to safe and legal abortion.
  • Trump: Back in 1999, he told Meet the Press that, despite his personal dislike of abortion, “I’m very pro-choice.” More recently, he announced, “I am pro-life.” This year, Trump he said on MSNBC that if abortion were banned, women who violated the law would have to be punished. Soon after, his campaign released a statement saying that providers, not patients, should be held liable. His running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, has backed some of the nation’s toughest abortion restrictions.

HIV/AIDS

  • Clinton: Her proposals include funding research to seek a cure; finding more affordable treatment, including capping prescription costs; urging all states to extend Medicaid coverage for people living with HIV; and increasing use of HIV prevention medication.
  • Trump: Has not issued a policy on HIV and AIDS, though some in the advocacy media say his goals of lowering prescription drug costs and increasing transparency about health care pricing could be beneficial.

Medical research funding

  • Clinton: Advocates increasing funding for Alzheimer’s research to $2 billion a year, paying for care-planning services through Medicare, and funding a federal program to help locate Alzheimer’s patients who wander.
  • Trump: Has called funding for Alzheimer’s research “a total top priority,” but he has not offered many specifics about policies he would pursue. He has alarmed the research community with scientifically unfounded statements about Ebola, autism, and climate change.

Autism

  • Clinton: Has called for a nationwide early-screening campaign. She wants to push all states to require health insurance coverage for autism services, help get adults on the autism spectrum connected to employment opportunities, and fund more research.
  • Trump: In tweets and during a presidential debate, Trump has linked autism to some vaccinations, a tie that has been widely debunked by international medical authorities and advocates, such as Autism Speaks, a group that Trump has supported.

Addiction and drugs

  • Clinton: Would increase funds for addiction treatment and prevention, and emphasize rehabilitation over prison for low-level and non-violent drug offenses. She wants more preventive services for adolescents, opioid antidotes for all first responders, and more training for drug prescribers.
  • Trump: In New Hampshire, Trump vowed to fight addiction on two fronts saying, “First, we have to support locally based and locally run clinics, and we have got to close the border. That’s where the drugs are coming from.”

Medical marijuana

  • Clinton: Supports the use of medical marijuana.
  • Trump:.Supports the use of medical marijuana.

Family and medical leave

  • Clinton: Advocates a paid family and medical leave of up to 12 weeks with at least a two-thirds wage replacement rate. She proposes paying for the plan with taxes on the wealthy.
  • Trump: He told Stuart Varney on Fox News last year, “Well, it’s something that’s being discussed. I think we have to keep our country very competitive, so you have to be careful of it.”

Federal funding of Planned Parenthood

Clinton: Supports federal funding of Planned Parenthood.
Trump: At a news conference on Super Tuesday, Trump said he would not give federal funds to Planned Parenthood because the organization performs abortions. But he praised the health care it provides, saying, “millions and millions of women – cervical cancer, breast cancer – are helped by Planned Parenthood.”

Covered California Rates Jump 13% in 2017

Covered California Rising costs

Covered California’s premiums jumped 13.2% for 2017, up from about a 4% increase in each of the past two years. However, most consumers will see a much smaller increase or pay less next year if they switch to another plan. California executive director Peter Lee said, “Shopping will be more important this year…Almost 80% of our consumers will be able to pay less than they are paying now, or see their rates go up by no more than 5% if they shop and buy the lowest-cost plan at their same benefit level.”

While premiums will rise, the subsidies will rise as well. About 90% of Covered California enrollees get help to pay for their premiums. The average subsidy covers roughly 77% of the consumer’s monthly premium. “Even though the average rate increase is larger this year than the Past two years, the three-year average increase is 7% – substantially better than rate trends before the Affordable Care Act was enacted,” Lee said.

Covered CaliforniaPremium increases 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 3-year average
Average weighted increase 4.2% 4% 13.2% 7%
Lowest price Bronze plan 4.4% 3.3% 3.9% 3.9%
Lowest priced Silver plan 4.8% 1.5% 8.1% 4.8%
Second lowest priced Silver plan 2.6% 1.8% 8.1% 4.1%
If a consumer switches to the lowest priced plan in the same tier -4.5% -1.2%

 

Lee said the average rate increase reflects the following factors:

  • A one-year adjustment due to the end of the reinsurance funding mechanism in the Affordable Care Act. The provision was designed to moderate rate increases during the first three years when exchanges were being established. The American Academy of Actuaries estimates that this will add 4% to 7% to premiums for 2017.
  • Special enrollment by some consumers who sign up only after they become sick or need care, which has had a significant effect on rates for two insurance plans.
  • The rising cost of health care, especially for specialty drugs.
  • Pent-up demand for health care among those who were uninsured before the Affordable Care Act.

Lee said, “Covered California is working to address some of these issues on multiple fronts. The exchange is aggressively marketing to attract healthy consumers year-round, and is working to ensure special enrollment is available only to those who meet qualifying circumstances. It is also sampling the special enrollment population to better understand how to make any further improvements needed.”

Covered California is reducing the number of services that are subject to a consumer’s deductible. Starting in 2017, consumers in Silver 70 plans will save as much as $55 on an urgent care visit and $10 on a primary care visit. Consumers in Silver, Gold, and Platinum plans will pay a flat copay for emergency room visits without having to satisfy a deductible, which could save them thousands of dollars.

These improvements build on features already in place that ensure most outpatient services in Silver, Gold and Platinum plans are not subject to a deductible, including primary care visits, specialist visits, lab tests, X-rays and imaging. Some Enhanced Silver plans have little or no deductible and very low copays, such as $3 for an office visit. Consumers in Covered California’s most affordable Bronze plans can see their doctor or a specialist three times before the visits are subject to the deductible.

The contract with health insurers for 2017 ensures that consumers select or are provisionally assigned a primary care physician. Below are the companies selected for the 2017 exchange:

  • Anthem Blue Cross of California
  • Molina Healthcare
  • Blue Shield of California
  • Oscar Health Plan of California
  • Chinese Community Health Plan
  • Sharp Health Plan
  • Health Net
  • Valley Health Plan
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • Western Health Advantage
  • A. Care Health Plan

The following carriers are increasing their coverage areas in 2017:

  • Oscar will be entering the market in San Francisco, Santa Clara, and San Mateo counties.
  • Molina will expand into Orange County.
  • Kaiser will be available in Santa Cruz County.

With the expansion of carriers, 93% of consumers will be able to choose from three or more carriers, and all will have at least two to select from. In addition, more than 93% of hospitals in California will be available through at least one Covered California health insurance company in 2017, and 74% will be available in three or more plans. Rate details by pricing regions can be found in Covered California’s Health Insurance Companies and Plan Rates for 2017, posted online at: http://coveredca.com/news/pdfs/CoveredCA-2017-rate-booklet.pdf.

U.S. faces crisis in long-term care funding, report finds

Many baby boomers have chronic illnesses and will eventually need long-term care but do not have the means to pay for it, according to a study sponsored by the National Institute on Aging. Americans have fewer children and higher divorce rates than in the past, leaving fewer avenues for help with funding long-term care, and the average cost for private nursing home care in 2010 was $229 per day — about $84,000 per year. HealthDay News (6/30)

Republicans Call for Review of HHS Fundraising

Senate Republicans are calling on the HHS Inspector General to investigate fundraising activities by HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The following is a summary of a letter to the HHS Inspector General from Senate Ranking Members Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) of the Senate Finance Committee, and Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs:

Major news outlets have reported that Sebelius is raising money from the private sector, including from health care executives, for use by a private entity, Enroll America, which is helping implement the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). These activities call into question whether appropriations and ethics laws are being followed.

Administration officials told The New York Times that private fundraising was necessary because Congress refused to provide enough money to carry out the health care law. An HHS spokesman said the Secretary’s efforts included meetings, calls, and events with 18 categories of people and organizations since January, including retail pharmacies, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and hospitals

Administration officials told The New York Times that the Secretary secured $10 million from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and a pledge of about $500,000 from H&R Block, which plans to help people apply for tax credits under the new law.

The Hill reported that a nonprofit promoting President Obama’s healthcare law has created an air of expectation that insurers will contribute to the group, according to an insurance industry official. Enroll America has come to feel like just an arm of the administration, said one official who works closely with insurers.

The Hill also reported that current and former administration officials have taken on leadership and fundraising roles for Enroll America. President Obama himself made a vague, but personal appeal for a close partnership with insurers, which some in the industry saw as a precursor to direct fundraising pitches. If true, these statements from the administration and the news reports would suggest the following:

· The Secretary has asked for financial support from at least two private entities.
· The Secretary has asked entities she regulates to support private efforts.
· The solicitation has been broad and has been taking place for months.
· These solicitations were in response to Congress’s refusal to appropriate more funds for PPACA implementation.
· The Secretary and other government officials may be attempting to raise funds for Enroll America from health insurers.
· There are close ties and substantial coordination between the Administration and Enroll America.

Last Updated 05/25/2022

Arch Apple Financial Services | Individual & Family Health Plans, Affordable Care California, Group Medical Insurance, California Health Insurance Exchange Marketplace, Medicare Supplements, HMO & PPO Health Care Plans, Long Term Care & Disability Insurance, Life Insurance, Dental Insurance, Vision Insurance, Employee Benefits, Affordable Care Act Assistance, Health Benefits Exchange, Buy Health Insurance, Health Care Reform Plans, Insurance Agency, Westminster, Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Fountain Valley, Irvine, Santa Ana, Tustin, Aliso Viejo, Laguna Hills, Laguna Beach, Laguna Woods, Long Beach, Orange, Tustin Foothills, Seal Beach, Anaheim, Newport Beach, Yorba Linda, Placentia, Brea, La Habra, Orange County CA

12312 Pentagon Street - Garden Grove, CA 92841-3327 - Tel: 714.638.0853 - 800.731.2590
Email:
Jay@ArchApple.com
Copyright @ 2015 - Website Design and Search Engine Optimization by Blitz Mogul